Sunday, April 17, 2016

These following practices need to be weeded out of first person gaming experience!

These following practices need to be weeded out of first person gaming and game companies should be financially PUNISHED by law for implementing them: 1. Farming and grinding. These horrible game mechanics pad playthrough hours in single player games giving them the illusion of unearned popularity. In multiplayer it causes resentment of people with real lives who have little time to spend on this nonsense. 2. On launch DLC. Chopping up the complete game and "revealing" the rest of the complete game only after more money is spent. This is dishonest and builds resentment for the game companies stupid enough to trade in their reputation for a short term gain. 3. DLC in a multiplayer game can build excessive amounts of resentment for those who don't have a small fortune to spend on items that should have been included in a balanced game inventory. 4. Always online DRM. This only comforts non-gamer stockholders and punishes those who bought the game legitimately. This means that easily pirating the game produces a game that is trouble free and runs smoothly. Sort of the opposite incentive to buy a legit copy, huh? 5. Unnecessary frontends applications. Unless your game company has dozens of games available STOP this absurd and moronic practice of constipating our computing resources with miniature operating systems to peddle your one or two popular game titles. Biggest offenders: My.com Uplay Games for windows live ... There are STILL games unable to launch because they canceled this "service"! HiRez's crappy Frontend. Spyware like HiPatchService.exe is also installed that does not close after you play Smite or Tribes Ascend. Bottom line: Let us purchase ONE TIME a play a well balanced, enjoyable experience where the gameplay quality is disconnected from our wallet. A REALLY good article on Frontends: http://highscalability.com/blog/2016/1/4/server-side-architecture-front-end-servers-and-client-side-r.html

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